Who Are You?

If I were to ask who are you, what would your response be? “I am an American” or “I am a manager” or “I am a Christian” etc… All these examples are only monikers of what you are, but never who you are. To identify by these simple labels excludes everything else, restricting further depth and meaning.

There are terms that we identify by more easily than others. Yes, these make for a succinct and quick identifier in order to convey and relate understanding to someone else but rarely are they ever completely accurate or entirely true. The problem that grows from this is that we eventually start identifying ourselves by these same terms, losing or never really discovering our own sense of self because of it.

We see everything in terms of what they are like instead of what they are. Today’s day and age appears obsessed with being able to relate to something else instead of simply being. We try to be Christian, Buddhist, Jewish, a manager, a worker, a leader, instead of just being ourselves. These terms and titles don’t identify us, but we try and let them to anyways. Never do we stop to figure out what makes us who we really are as we are a culmination of our experiences.

So let me ask again: Who are you?

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The Snapshots We Take

Whenever we first meet someone, we take a mental snapshot. Their actions, mannerisms, personality, looks, hair, clothes… In our mind, carry this mental image of them and take it with us throughout the rest of our lives. This polaroid stored in our mind represents that person and what they mean to our lives.

As time passes, people change but rarely do we ever go back and change our perceptions of them. This picture does not represent them, no more than your baby pictures represent you. This even applies to different periods in our lives, how we were as a teenager, husband, wife, parent… Are you the same person as you were back in high school? I’m willing to bet not.

We continue to take snapshots as we go about our lives, however. What we don’t realize is that we take new snapshots of the same people, but only remember the first one we ever took. Are these people the same as from when you first met them? Who do you see them now as? Maybe its time to start using the more recent picture…

We are a culmination of our experiences and perceptions. Just because we may have been a different person back in high school or before we were married doesn’t mean that that’s not us, its just a different part. The people that surround us go through the same thing. So I ask you this: Who are you still trying to perceive as the same person from when you first met them? It could very well be yourself.